Race Story – Cotswolds 113 Middle Distance Race

Humm, why was I racing a middle distance race on the flatlands of the Cotswolds when my friends were doing a perfectly good standard race in Windermere? Precisely because it is flat and the Lake District isn’t. I entered when the date was in June and it was a preparation race for a flat Ironman in July. The best laid plans, ah well, me and the rest of the world. I realise I am very lucky to get any racing at all; it’s definitely a luxury in today’s world.   

I’m not sure I thought about luxury as I racked. In fact that early in the morning I’m pretty sure I didn’t think anything at all. Paddy’s marshal briefing was at 4.45am so I was the first person into transition which, luckily, had great lights. Something missing off my kit list was a head torch.

It was odd swimming in a small, shallow, WARM pond surrounded by trees. I hadn’t realised how much I look at, and appreciate, the amazing views of space and mountains when I swim at home. Weird watching weed the whole way round, I do like the patterns it makes. The staggered start (Covid safe) and the shallow warm water worked well and I came in in 36:05 which is my fastest time ever in a middle distance apart from river swims with currents. I thought that was really interesting as I haven’t done any focused swim training, or intervals, or fast work. I have purely swum around in the Lakes stopping to look at the view. How does that work then?

It was odd having neutralized transitions. 10 minutes in T1 and 5 minutes in T2. Although having decided to use the loo in T2 I still managed to be late leaving it and ended up with an eleven second penalty. I’ll revert to my normal, less pleasant, practice next time.

It was also odd, and not in such a good way, riding Paddy’s tt bike. For various reasons I have probably only ridden it a handful of times and never for long. My mistake. The bike leg went ok, covering 56 miles in 2:57, averaging approx 18.6 mph and putting out approx 150 watts. Handling could have been better, lack of practice, and the bits into a strong headwind were hard work. I’d love to say the views were good but I had my head down…. The marshals however were fantastic. Hoards of six on every junction, some stopping traffic, illegal or not, others just shouting support.

Then I tried to run….even odder …. my body is not used to being held in a cramped, tucked position for three hours and it complained by refusing to stand up properly and then refusing to pick my feet up properly. So the run was a fairly painful affair – serve me right – but the route was lovely. Three laps and my head was up enough to appreciate a very pretty run route, mostly off road, along ponds, (I guess they are little Lakes really) and through woodland. Lots of tree roots to fall over. The trend in amazing marshals continued and having our names printed on our numbers meant a lot of the support was personalised. A great help. A slow 2:07.

Followed by a slow two days as my hamstrings gradually loosened off.  This is a great, flat, middle distance race. Very well organised with the best marshalling ever. There are two dates for next year coming on line. The early one would be an ideal race for Lakesman entrants and the local Premier Inn has comfy beds and a pub next door. … Club trip?  

Ps apologies for the very poor photos, we were both too busy.

HELLvelyn Triathlon

A bucket list event held on my doorstep – so why ever not? Maybe because the swim is cold, the cycle ride goes up The Struggle which is a climb listed in ’10 of the UK’s toughest climbs’. It lasts for 4.8km and climbs over 1200ft with sections of 24%. There is a flat bit in the middle. The ‘run’ then almost summits Helvellyn – it turns right with about 50 metres of climb to go. It climbs about 3,000ft and goes up Swirral Edge scramble. No reason at all then.

Even more fun when some friends decide to do it as well, and Paddy comes as support – coffee and hugs on tap. I was ridiculously nervous. Maybe because it was the first race of the season and I’m always nervous for that one. Maybe because I haven’t fell run regularly for over ten years so it did feel like a very big challenge.

A field in rural Cumbria contrasted with the presence of a pro-field and Alsitair Brownlee turned up, having raced in Hamburg the day before. Luckily no 14 day isolation required! He went on to break the old course record, which he set when he was 19. Social distance spacing in transition looked suspiciously like a normal cramped transition and I wasn’t about to get the tape measure out. Have to say though the COVID silver lining was the presence of more toilets than normal and quantities of both gel and loo roll.

A beautiful, cold Ullswater (13 degrees) welcomed us and we were supposed to start at 5 second intervals. This rapidly turned into ‘get everyone in: any order and any spacing will do’. So apologies to those who were hoping to spectate, all our timings went straight out the window and my warm up was just a little rushed. We jumped in leaving Paddy surrounded by a big pile of gear. Flat lake, tight course, hop out, run round a buoy, hop back in again. Felt good in the water, if a trifle chilly.

On to the bike, 10% chance of rain and the sun was starting to come out. That lasted for the first ten minutes. By the time we got the the A66 it was henious. So horrible it was quite exhilerating. Poor visibility, greyness, spray, caravans. Coat on. Dunmail was easy, the Struggle wasn’t. No suprise there then. Quick hug with Paddy at the top, it was that kind of race, and an update on how the others were doing. Wet descent. I thought how nice of them to place an ambulance with flashing lights half way down to remind me to slow down. Must have been tired, it was there because someone had gone through the wall. Sluggish with some cramp issues on the bike.

Easy in transition to keep the cramp at bay; also because Alistair was being interviewed so I paused for a listen. First mile easy, settle into things gently, only eight left to go. Then the course went straight up. Postive head – ‘ thank goodness its uphill, thank goodness it’s uphill’, repeat. My legs couldn’t cope with going down at that point. The clouds were now blowing off and the fells were absolutely stunning. Thankfully I hadn’t taken my phone or I’d still be there taking photos. Luckily Stephen took some instead. The main climb finished off up Swirral Edge which was fun – wet rock and lots of people not used to scrambling. Then down, down, down.

Finally through the finish in just under six hours. I was the last of us to finish so I got the biggest welcome reception. With a touch of black humour the organisers had left us one last little Covid challenge – collect your own medal and the medal box was on the floor.

Successes of all kinds – Stephen raised over £1000 for Vision of Adventure ( a local charity supporting visually impaired athletes), he also not only survived but successfully smashed his second ever triathlon. Jack learnt loads to take forward to his ironman next year. I managed a respectable fell run having not done that for a very long time. And fun was had by all, both beforehand and on the day. In fact the crack was so good we may even contemplate doing it again.

Manage my Fear, Strathpuffer 24 hour relay MTB race, Jan 2019

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I was inspired by a blog written by a team of 13 year old girls who completed ‘the Strathpuffer’ last year. This is a 24 hr mountain bike race in a forest in the North of Scotland, held in January. My rationale was that if they could do it so can women who are over 50.  It will be fun, something different and a bit of a challenge. That was July, in the hottest summer for years.

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I needed a  light in a black hole

January 2019 and I have a team of women, and a fear monkey. This is supposed to be a little bit of fun but my head as gone into overdrive and is hiding in a black hole somewhere. It quite often does this before races. Eating gets harder, my head is convinced I’m ill, it’s normally lying. It’s trying to protect me from myself. After a week of this I decided this is ridiculous and we sit down and have a big talk with each other.

What is the issue? There are several – as someone very close to me pointed out I am a lousy mountain biker, I hate being cold and get cold very easily and I can’t function without sleep. Ideal! And all of those mean I might let the team down and that isn’t OK, So how do I get out of this hole? Find the evidence to convince myself these problems aren’t problems….

Continue reading “Manage my Fear, Strathpuffer 24 hour relay MTB race, Jan 2019”

World Championships Rotterdam 2017

Rotterdam, what a party, what a blast. Olympic Distance World Championship Triathlon, whooop whooo. I don’t know what it is about the sport. In the days before you complain about all the faff, organising, walking about, difficulty of transport etc. And then you race, and all that tension and pent up energy explodes. Amazing bike course, just screamingly good fun, adrenaline flood. A few weeks later I am still high and still can’t wait to do it again.